Ambitious discontent

My greatest difficulty at present is that I am afflicted with too many ambitions. In the past 24 hours I have:

  1. Wanted to be a college professor,
  2. Felt called to prison ministry,
  3. Wished to start a Christian high-end grocery store,
  4. Debated whether to join the Army as enlisted or an officer,
  5. Imagined starting a young married couples ministry at my church,
  6. Re-structured my morning devotionals (twice),
  7. And planned a novel series.

Every one of these was a serious consideration, and not a passing whimsy. It’s like I’m suddenly seven again, except that I was never like this, even at seven.

What I can’t decide is whether this sort of ambitious discontent is from God or somewhere else.

Early-afternoon Links?

I’m late this morning. David had a doctor’s appointment this morning at 8:45 for a case of RSV, which is actually something like a really, really bad cold. So bad that it causes pneumonia. An 8:45 appointment means seeing the LPN at around 10:00, which is to say we got home at around noon. As an added bonus, the doctor’s office and the pharmacy are having a little disagreement about whether our insurance will pay for David’s breathing treatment. Fortunately, a moderate case of pneumonia is as nothing to basic asthma, so I’m unimpressed with his pressing need for expensive asthma medication.

But links:

  1. Confusing “unfettered capitalism” with mercantilism.
  2. Billy Graham at Harvard. Unfortunately, in RealMedia format.
  3. Obama and his teleprompter. I thought it was safety glass.
  4. Apparent proof that Obama is not an idiot. Though it leaves the other option (either stupid or…).
  5. Often, good politicians lie. Adroit politicians lie often.
  6. It looks, however, like Obama is really starting to feel the weight of the presidency. Or at least, the press is beginning to feel something.
  7. Scripophily – like collecting stamps!
  8. An excellent quote by the former president of my seminary, especially when applied to 1 Corinthians 12.
  9. Divine Vinyl – Brace yourself.
  10. Well it ought to be.
  11. Two words – Central Planning.
  12. The complications of being a senator and an OBGYN.
  13. Barry Manilow – not a weapon? (H/T: Dan Phillips)
  14. Also via Mr. Phillips: Letters to the editor re: Galatians.
  15. Just don’t get it. “Don’t waste your sports” is only slightly more confusing than “don’t waste your jigsaw puzzles.”
  16. Proper use of capital and lowercase numbers – which is why I now type everything in the Georgia font, if I possibly can.
  17. Also: spacing between sentences. So hard to unlearn!
  18. Barak Carter? Jimmy Obama?
  19. Logic!
  20. Watchmen, a review. Any movie rendition without the pirate comic would be a certain improvement, but even then, this movie is rated R, for the same reason the Passion was rated R, with the exception that the Passion is about the gospel, while Watchmen sort of wants to be, but isn’t. Well, they got sin right, anyway.
  21. Flash fiction. (Officially creepy.)
  22. Love makes for great photography. Because there’s no way that those bowls are intrinsically beautiful.
  23. Taking up slack. As soon as I get done taking care of my perpetually sick kid, I’ve got a list of certifications to work on while I look for new work. Oh, and I’m writing again.
  24. Worse than poverty? Yes.
  25. Ha! Something about a historical “living document” which claims a triumph of orthodox theology over heretics just sticks funny with me. Are we talking orthodox or Orthodox, here? The “living document” thing is why I’m inclined to mistrust the Textus Receptus over against modern critical versions of the Bible. The Textus Receptus was preserved by the Orthodox, and they have this thing for preserving “the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints” in “living documents.”
  26. Professors tend to be liberals. Who knew?
  27. Continuing a classic trend in American prison systems.
  28. Bankruptcy, as seen through a cheap gass grill
  29. Against children’s church.
  30. Might be useful.
  31. Fleeting temptation. Just… wow.
  32. On the other hand, an interesting paradigm for avoiding it, though lacking in detail
  33. Confusing Sam with John.
  34. A different Sam. Check the quip quotes at the end.
  35. Don’t lose the keys! Rather the Protestant position, I should think:

    Some poor prelate forgot to pass them to his heir,
    but when Martin Luther found them,
    il Papa claimed they weren’t there.

    Well, he claimed that those keys weren’t the keys, anyway.

  36. On the health care debate. There’s a gap in these arguments that I could put my finger on, if I took the time to find it.
  37. In which “woo-woo” is exemplified.
  38. A new approach to scripture memory. This actually works. I can still remember the titles of books I never read as a child, because they were on my bookshelf and I looked at the binding every day.

Thought to Ponder

From my reading this morning:

God’s people tend to suffer a lot of false guilt over sins they have already confessed and received forgiveness for. The big ones and the minor ones. Even attitudes. We long to live lives that are beyond reproach. We want to be perfect parents, perfect children, perfect friends, perfect Christians, perfect people. But we are not always empathetic and forgiving. We have trouble demonstrating unconditional love. We are not always kind. Sometimes we even have temper tantrums. And sometimes we are blanketed by depression.



Why do we have all the struggle? Why is it so difficult to see ourselves as God sees us — on the one hand, sinners who cannot be good enough to please him; on the other hand, his beloved children, forgiven and restored? Once reason, as we’ve discovered, is that we’re often preoccupied with the opinions of other people rather than with God’s. We’ve adopted this world’s standards. We judge ourselves and others by those standards, forgetting all that the Father has to say about us.


But as we begin to recognize and accept our standing in God’s value system, we can be free from the struggle for self esteem, the maneuvers to bolster our egos, the fight for our place in the pecking order. Freedom will come when our views of ourselves don’t depend on the looks, physique, or intelligence we inherited, the family we were born into, the size of our bank account, or even how others treat us. A general principle is: When you feel comfortable about yourself, about who you are and what you have, you can direct your focus away from yourself and toward others.


Norma Kvindlog and Ester Lindgren Anderson (From Beyond Me)

The Title Says it All

So my dad was offered several free magazine subscriptions that he had basically already paid for so he decided to get some random titles that looked like they might be interesting. One of the magazines he is having sent to the house is called Working Mother.

Sounds interesting right? Well, when the first one arrived I flipped through it and found it to be both intriguing and appalling at the same time. This second issue is no different.

On the cover there is a perfectly coiffed platinum blonde mother and her two platinum blond children. One boy and one girl of course and they look to be about 7 and 10. Oh, and by the way, the Papa is missing in the photo because this is about the working mother.

In the past year or so, I have come to the conclusion that you cannot be a mom and a career woman and be satisfied with your life in both arenas. You can either be the best mom or be the best at your career. It takes more than 40 hours a week to do either them exceptionally and there aren’t enough hours in the week (unless you intend not to sleep and no one can go full throttle on no sleep for long).

Now I’m not saying that a mom can’t work. In fact, there are a lot of women who enjoy their jobs and being a mom. And there are lots of women who have jobs they might not like so much but have them because of financial constraints on the family. What I am saying is that the focus and time allotment to really succeed cannot be divided between two objectives: motherhood and careerhood.

The table of contents of Working Mother really hits this dilemma on the head, or should I say the order in which articles are clumped exemplify the point. First up are the articles focused on You, then Work, and finally Family.

The main problem is found in the first focus: you. When we focus on ourselves everything else does come secondarily and even tertiarily. But I believe that our positions in which we serve others (family and church) suffer the most. Even careers don’ suffer as much because ultimately a career is also self-focused and about how I can get ahead, make more money, attain esteem, etc.